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Recent Research on Men's Groups:

Over the past two-years Impotence Australia has researched in the area of men's health groups. One study called the Men's Doctors Project 2002 found that contrary to popular belief men are wanting to attend groups to discuss sexual functioning. A more recent study has shown that there are few outlets for men to access information about sexual health. Health professionals express that they perceive a need for men's groups, as well as staff training. If you have any comments on men's groups please email us: here

This fact sheet provides basic information on CIALIS TM (tadalafil), a new oral treatment for erectile dysfunction. For more information, you should consult your doctor.

What is CIALIS?

Cialis belongs to a group of medicines called phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors.
It is a yellow, film-coated, almond-shaped, oral tablet prescribed to treat men suffering from erectile dysfunction.
Cialis is not an aphrodisiac and does not increase libido. It requires sexual stimulation to be effective.

How is CIALIS different to VIAGRA®?
Cialis and Viagra belong to the same class of drug - PDE5 inhibitors.

The main difference between Cialis and Viagra is their length of duration. On average, Viagra lasts for between four and six hours. Cialis has been proven effective for up to 36 hours giving a broader window of opportunity to choose the moment in which to have sex.

How does CIALIS work?

Cialis helps to relax the blood vessels in the penis, allowing blood to flow into the penis causing an erection. However, it will only help a man to get an erection if he is sexually stimulated. Men who do not have erectile dysfunction should not take Cialis.

How do you take CIALIS?

Cialis is available in two strengths, 10 mg and 20 mg. The recommended starting dose is 20mg. The 10mg dose is available for patients who suffer from renal impairment (kidney problems). Cialis is taken prior to sexual activity. It can be taken with or without food or alcohol.

Clinical trials have shown that, with sexual stimulation, Cialis starts working in as little as 16 minutes and can remain effective for up to 36 hours.

The maximum recommended dose is one tablet per day.

Cialis should be taken only as directed by your doctor, who will take into account any other medications you may be taking.

What side affects may be associated with CIALIS?

Side effects for all PDE5 inhibitors are similar.

In clinical trials of more than 4000 men the most common side effects identified with Cialis were headaches and upset stomachs. Less frequent side effects were backache, nasal congestion, myalgia (mild muscle aches) and flushing. Side effects were mild to moderate, did not last long, and usually decreased as men continued to take the medication.

Cialis does not appear to have an effect on vision.

Only 1.7 per cent of men taking Cialis in the studies discontinued due to side effects. This compares to a 1.1 per cent discontinuation rate of patients who were on placebo (i.e. no medication).

Who cannot take CIALIS?

  • Any man who has been informed by his doctor that he is not fit enough to resume sexual activity.
    Cialis should not be used by men for whom sexual intercourse is inadvisable due to unstable cardiovascular disease (e.g. patients with unstable angina and severe congestive heart failure).
  • Patients who are taking any nitrate medication
    Nitrate medicines are commonly prescribed for relief of angina pectoris (chest pain). In combination with Cialis, they could seriously lower blood pressure. Patients should inform their doctor if they are taking any of these medicines or ask if they are not certain.

CIALIS and Poppers

Some people use non-prescribed nitrates socially or sexually. CIALIS must not be combined with nitrite inhalants ("poppers") or any form of nitrates, because the combination may result in dangerously low blood pressure, which could be fatal.

CIALIS (tadalafil) and Protease Inhibitors

Ritonavir and saquinavir should be administered with caution as they may cause an increase in plasma concentration of Cialis.

Patients with the following should not take CIALIS:

  • Severe heart problems
  • stroke within the last 6 months
  • low blood pressure
  • a known hypersensitivity to tadalafil or to any ingredient of the tablet

Cialis should not be taken in combination with other erectile dysfunction treatments.

What conditions MAY PREVENT a man using CIALIS?

Cialis should be used with caution by the following:

  • men who have conditions that might predispose them to priapism (a persistent, painful erection). Such conditions include sickle cell anaemia, multiple myeloma, or leukaemia.
  • men with anatomical deformation of the penis (such as angulation, cavernosal fibrosis or Peyronie's disease).

Can women take Cialis?

Cialis is not licensed for use in women.

What happens if I increase the dose?

An increase in dose should always occur under close medical supervision.

Can I drive while taking Cialis?

Cialis can cause dizziness. Patients should be aware of how they react to the drug before they drive or operate machinery.

Will it work for everyone?

Clinical trials have shown Cialis 20mg to be effective in 81 per cent of men.

If Cialis does not help you to get an erection, or your erection does not last long enough for you to complete your chosen sexual activity you should tell your doctor. There are other effective treatment options available and information can be obtained from your doctor or Impotence Australia.

Impotence Telephone Help-line (02) 9280 0084 (Sydney Callers)
or National Toll Free Call 1800 800 614

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