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Recent Research on Men's Groups:

Over the past two-years Impotence Australia has researched in the area of men's health groups. One study called the Men's Doctors Project 2002 found that contrary to popular belief men are wanting to attend groups to discuss sexual functioning. A more recent study has shown that there are few outlets for men to access information about sexual health. Health professionals express that they perceive a need for men's groups, as well as staff training. If you have any comments on men's groups please email us: here

Viagra

Viagra (sildenafil) is the first oral treatment for erectile dysfunction (impotence) to be licensed in Australia. This fact sheet provides basic information on VIAGRA; for more information, you should consult your doctor

What is VIAGRA?
Viagra belongs to a group of medicines called phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors.
It is blue, diamond shaped, oral tablet prescribed to treat men suffering from clinical erectile dysfunction.
It is not an aphrodisiac and does not increase libido.

How does Viagra work?
Viagra works by helping to relax the blood vessels in the penis, allowing blood to flow into the penis causing an erection. However, it will only help a man to get an erection if he is sexually stimulated. It should not be taken by men who do not have erectile dysfunction.

How do you take Viagra?
Viagra is available in three strengths, 25 mg, 50 mg and 100 mg. The initial dose is selected by your doctor. Viagra should be swallowed whole with some water about an hour before anticipated sexual activity. The amount of time it takes to work varies from person to person, on average it takes between 20 minutes to one hour. Within a 1 to 6 hour period after taking the tablet an erection should occur in response to sexual stimulation. A man may find that Viagra takes longer to work if taken with a heavy meal. Alcohol consumption can temporarily interfere with the erection process. To get the maximum benefit from the medication it is advisable not to drink large amounts of alcohol before taking Viagra. Viagra should not be used more than once a day. Viagra should be taken only as directed by your doctor, who will take into account any other medications you may be taking.

What side affects may be associated with Viagra?
The manufacturers have tested the drug on nearly 4,000 men during 21 clinical trials. When taken at the recommended doses some side effects have been reported although they were generally mild to moderate and brief in length. The most common side effects are headache and facial flushing. Less commonly reported are indigestion, dizziness, stuffy nose and effects on vision (predominantly a blue colour tinge to vision and increased brightness of light or blurred vision).

Who cannot take Viagra?
Any man who has been informed by his doctor that he is not fit enough to resume sexual activity. Patients who are taking any nitrate medications Nitrate medicines are commonly prescribed for relief of angina pectoris "chest pain". In combination with Viagra, they could seriously lower blood pressure. Patients should inform their Doctor if they are taking any of these medicines or ask if they are not certain.

VIAGRA and Poppers
Some people use non-prescribed nitrates socially or sexually.
VIAGRA must not be combined with nitrite inhalants ("poppers") or any form of nitrates, because the combination may result in dangerously low blood pressure, which could be fatal.

Viagra (sidenafil) and Protease Inhibitors
Viagra doses must be low when it is used with HIV protease inhibitors (especially ritonavir), because these antivirals reduce the metabolism of sildenafil in the liver, resulting in abnormally high blood levels that can cause adverse effects. The combination apparently does not affect blood levels of protease inhibitors. It has been recommended that a single does 25 mg of sildenafil in a 48 hour period should not be exceeded in patients receiving HIV protease inhibitors

Patients with the following should not take Viagra:
Known hypersensitivity to any component of the drug Viagra. Severe heart or liver problem. Recent stroke, heart attack, or low blood pressure. Certain rare inherited eye diseases (such as retintis pigmentosa). Viagra should not be taken in combination with other erectile dysfunction treatments.

What conditions MAY PREVENT a man using Viagra?
An abnormally formed penis. Diseases that might result in prolonged erection e.g. sickle cell anameia (an abnormality of red blood cells), multiple myeloma (cancer of bone marrow) or leukemia (cancer of blood cells). Bleeding disorders, such as, haemophilia or peptic ulceration (stomach ulcer).

Can women take Viagra?
Viagra should not be taken by women. It is not licensed for use in women and its safety in women has not been tested.

What happens if I increase the dose?
An increase in dose should always occur under close medical supervision. Clinical trials have shown that increasing the drug beyond the maximum recommended dose of 100 mg simply increases the side effects and not the efficacy.

Can I drive while taking Viagra?
Viagra can cause dizziness and effects on vision. Patients should be aware of how they react to the drug before they drive or operate machinery.

Will it work for everyone?
If Viagra does not help you to get an erection, or your erection does not last long enough for you to complete your chosen sexual activity you should tell your doctor who will be able to help. There are other effective treatment options available and information can be obtained from your doctor or Impotence Australia.

Impotence Telephone Help-line (02) 9280 0084

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